Poetic Form and how to use it: A guide for Edexcel IGCSE and all unseen poetry | jwpblog

Poetic Form and how to use it: A guide for Edexcel IGCSE and all unseen poetry | jwpblog

Dr Ammara Ashraf, who joined my department last term has produced many little gems which glitter proudly in our shared resources area.

She has allowed me to share further this PowerPoint on Form for exam students at IGCSE, GCSE and A level.

Poetic Form and Meaning IGCSE

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USA lit essay discussion | jwpblog

USA lit essay discussion | jwpblog

‘In the Land of the Free, the Journey: Quest, conquest and homecoming, is the driving force of literary exploration.’ Explore this idea in the texts you have read. Be sure to use GG in your response and to refer to at least two texts in the essay.

 

Find the discussion sound files below. An interesting discussion from an essay which does not quite fit the needs of the mark scheme, but which is interesting in many areas…

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And another…
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A give back: Marking US lit A levels | jwpblog

A give back: Marking US lit A levels | jwpblog

I recently set this essay for my Upper 6th.

 

The results were variable. For many the essay swiftly became an exercise in listing isolated characters or situations and the Assessment Objectives became lost.

The driving AO is AO3 in this question.

Thus any essay which does not foreground contexts will not be well rewarded. These contexts need to be relevant the creation and reception of the text and are contexts which can be derived from the wider understanding of the era and millieux of the texts themselves.

For me, I wish to see each section of argument introduced with topic…

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USA Lit unseen: Richard Wright | jwpblog

USA Lit unseen: Richard Wright | jwpblog

This week the unseen is from Richard Wright’s  The Man Who Was Almost A Man. Whilst the book was published in the 1960s, the content and style make it eminently suitable for unseen practice.

Richard Wright’s short story entitled The man who was almost a man, suggests by title alone a tale of frustrated ambition or thwarted dreams.

As the passage opens, we meet ‘Dave’, later identified as ‘David Saunders’, a young black farmhand who seems to be in trouble for the shooting of a mule and who leaves at the end of the passage to seek a new life by travelling the railroad. At once we are…

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Gatsby essay planning idea | jwpblog

Gatsby essay planning idea | jwpblog

Today my Upper 6th class were recovering from a late night: a trip to an Immersive Gatsby performance. We were looking at planning essays – specifically finding good links between the ideas which make up an essay.

Rather than a title, we played the game of opening the text at a random page and choosing a quotation on which to base an exploration of themes, across 2 texts.

Here are the results of 20 minutes thinking.

 

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USA Lit contexts booklet (OCR) | jwpblog

USA Lit contexts booklet (OCR) | jwpblog

My Upper 6th are preparing contexts booklets to help them prepare for the OCR A level AO3 strand.

I am placing them here to help them to find them swiftly when not in school. Please feel free to browse and use to stimulate your own discussions.

American Literature contexts 1

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USA Literature unseen: Theodore Dreiser OCR | jwpblog

USA Literature unseen: Theodore Dreiser OCR | jwpblog

An unseen model response  for OCR:

This passage from Dreiser’s 1925 novel An American Tragedy seems to establish a possible link to the title of the novel in the juxtaposition of a ‘small band’ of religious itinerants who are seeking to navigate their way through the relatively hostile environment of the New America of the 20th century.

As soon as the passage opens, Dreiser plunges us into a setting which combines a fin de siecle feeling seen in the abrupt ‘stage direction’  ‘Dusk – of a summer night’. ‘Dusk’ itself is suggestive of a closing down and the ‘summer night’ – emphasised by…

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