Using different critical interpretations | Mrs P

Using different critical interpretations | Mrs P

This is a link to a short lecture on how to use critical interpretations, focusing on Twelfth Night, A Doll’s House and the poetry of Christina Rossetti. This lecture was delivered as part of a Lunchtime Lecture series.

This is aimed at students studying for the OCR A Level English Literature, Drama and Poetry Pre-1900 paper.

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USA lit essay discussion | jwpblog

USA lit essay discussion | jwpblog

‘In the Land of the Free, the Journey: Quest, conquest and homecoming, is the driving force of literary exploration.’ Explore this idea in the texts you have read. Be sure to use GG in your response and to refer to at least two texts in the essay.

 

Find the discussion sound files below. An interesting discussion from an essay which does not quite fit the needs of the mark scheme, but which is interesting in many areas…

https://ift.tt/2EhZI1s
And another…
https://ift.tt/2T0qaqX
 

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Using different critical interpretations | Mrs P

Using different critical interpretations | Mrs P

This is a link to a short lecture on how to use critical interpretations, focusing on Twelfth Night, A Doll’s House and the poetry of Christina Rossetti. This lecture was delivered as part of a Lunchtime Lecture series.

This is aimed at students studying for the OCR A Level English Literature, Drama and Poetry Pre-1900 paper.

Continue reading at:
https://ift.tt/2H4sYMr

The making of a MOOC | hannahruthtyreman

The making of a MOOC | hannahruthtyreman

The scenario of being asked to use a virtual learning environment, a set of laptops or devices, or indeed an interactive whiteboard is likely to be a familiar one to teachers. More familiar still might be the expectation that this technology is used in your teaching and the research evidence supporting its effective use is an afterthought.

On Monday 11 March, a free online course, entitled Using technology in evidence-based teaching and learning launches on FutureLearn with the Chartered College of Teaching and this course will prompt ways of thinking about uses of technology to support…

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This much I know about…looking after our own mental health first | johntomsett

This much I know about…looking after our own mental health first | johntomsett

I have been a teacher for 30 years, a Headteacher for 15 years and, at the age of 54, this much I know about looking after our own mental health first.

On the day we are officially charged by the DfE with supporting the mental health of our students, I think it is worth taking a moment to reflect upon how the way we think might help preserve our own mental health. It’s a little bit like how adults need to fit the oxygen mask first on aeroplanes, before attending to their children.

I always take time to read Oliver Burkeman’s Guardian column. Oliver is one of our alumni. After…

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Because Sir Doesn’t Care | stealingbiscuitsiswrong?

Because Sir Doesn’t Care | stealingbiscuitsiswrong?

After an incredibly stressful Year 11 lesson in which several members of that group had to be removed for defiant behaviour. This was the comment that greeted me the next day when a member of the class asked one student why they hadn’t been in the lesson the day before.

The comment was designed to wound and I was acutely aware of that and yet when the student said it, it still hurt. I was horrified that a student might think that I didn’t care about them. I asked myself that night, if in enforcing the school’s behaviour pathway and attempting to ensure that the classroom environment was…

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Because Sir Doesn’t Care | stealingbiscuitsiswrong?

Because Sir Doesn’t Care | stealingbiscuitsiswrong?

After an incredibly stressful Year 11 lesson in which several members of that group had to be removed for defiant behaviour. This was the comment that greeted me the next day when a member of the class asked one student why they hadn’t been in the lesson the day before.

The comment was designed to wound and I was acutely aware of that and yet when the student said it, it still hurt. I was horrified that a student might think that I didn’t care about them. I asked myself that night, if in enforcing the school’s behaviour pathway and attempting to ensure that the classroom environment was…

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https://ift.tt/2Euty49

The return of the card sort  | Jules Daulby

The return of the card sort  | Jules Daulby

Ditch the card sort at your peril.

A card sort can be anything from cutting some information up and then piecing it back together to using cards with information and sorting into piles. 

Card sorts get a bad press. Often described as a remnant of the past where teachers spent hours laminating and cutting up pieces of paper. The technique was, in my opinion unfairly blamed as part of the heavy workload culture. Recording behaviour points on SIMs are laugh at card sorts knowing that they are currently in favour. Quizzes for retrieval practice goad the puny card sort from their newly…

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Unseen Poem – How does the poet create a sense of place in ‘Island Man’? | Mrs P

Unseen Poem – How does the poet create a sense of place in ‘Island Man’? | Mrs P

This is the opening section of an unseen poem response based on the Edexcel iGCSE English Literature poetry question: How does the poet create a sense of place in ‘Island Man’?

This isn’t either complete or perfect but it gives a suggestion of where you might take an answer and how it could be structured. It was completed in about 20 minutes after planning as a class but would obviously need to be extended for a ‘real’ answer. During planning, the focus was on making sure that close analysis was clearly linked to the task.

Do leave a comment with any suggestions of how this could be…

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Being shocked keeps us human. | Jules Daulby

Being shocked keeps us human. | Jules Daulby

What appals us initially can become normalised over time if we are exposed enough and our leaders show no reaction. This is especially true when there is motive attached to a mission such as improving life chances for the disadvantaged. Phrases such as ‘kill with kindness’, ‘tough love’ and ‘it’s for your own good’ purport to show care by ensuring short term suffering because ‘it will be better for them in the long run’. 

Recently there has been some shocking allegations highlighted in a head teachers’ blog post about an operation called ‘flattening the grass’. It is clear this phrase…

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